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Category Archives: Lifestyle

5 places to see before they disappear

Ever heard of doom tourism? This trend involves traveling to threatened destinations. These five natural wonders are endangered because of pollution, climate change, and development. Visit them before they are gone.

Maldives

This popular tourist destination is an archipelago of 1190 coral islands that are known for their stunning beaches and scuba diving. However, it is also the lowest-lying country on earth – the islands are only a few feet above sea level. This makes them the most vulnerable to the rise in sea levels caused by climate change.

Majuli Island

The largest river island in India is located on the Brahmaputra in Assam. The pretty green wetland attracts migratory birds every winter. It’s also famous for its 36 satras, or Vaishanva monasteries that have their own unique traditions and festivals. However, Majuli has been shrinking every year due to soil erosion caused by the strong currents of the Brahmaputra.

The Dead Sea

The only place on earth where you can float without knowing how to swim, the Dead Sea is actually a lake. Its water is ten times more saline than seawater, and is believed to contain healing minerals. In the last 40 years, it has shrunk by a third and sunk 80 feet, due to diversion of water from River Jordan, its only source of fresh water.

Mount Kilimanjaro


The highest mountain in Africa is a dormant volcano that’s famous for its distinctive ice-capped summit. A popular trekking spot, its peak offers stunning views of the surrounding plains. Over the last century, its glaciers have shrunk by more than 80 percent and are likely to disappear completely in the next few decades.

The Arctic

The North Pole is known for its bleak yet stunning landscape of gigantic icebergs, polar bears, and the northern lights. However, rising temperatures and the melting of ice sheets pose a threat to the emperor penguins. It also affects the delicate ecosysystem, and subsequently, the polar bear population in the region.

Pictures Credit: Reuters

 
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Posted by on September 30, 2014 in 2014, Lifestyle

 

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12 Best Power Foods for Women

1) PARMESAN CHEESE strengthens bones

PARMESAN CHEESE strengthens bones

Calcium is key for preventing osteoporosis (especially in your 20s). Yogurt and nonfat milk help, but who wants them three times a day? Work Parmesan cheese into your diet; its 340 mg of calcium per ounce – compared to about 200 mg in cheddar or Swiss – goes a long way toward your 1000 mg/day quota.

2) APPLES boost immunity

APPLES boost immunity

Smart and sweet, apples are rich in quercetin, an antioxidant that can bolster your body’s disease-fighting abilities. In one study from Appalachian State University, just 5 percent of people who ate more quercetin came down with a respiratory infection over a two-week period, compared to 45 percent of those who didn’t.

3) LENTILS build your iron stores

LENTILS build your iron stores

Low-calorie lentils pack about 30 percent of your daily iron per cup cooked. About 12 percent of young women have low iron stores – at the extreme, that leads to anemia. But one study found that even women who were iron deficient (not anemic) had poorer performances on skill tests than those with normal levels.

4) BROCCOLI fights wrinkles

BROCCOLI fights wrinkles

“A cup of broccoli has 100 percent of your vitamin C—crucial for production of collagen, which gives skin elasticity,” says Tammy Lakatos Shames, R.D. It’s also rich in beta-carotene, which the body converts to vitamin A. This vitamin assists in cell turnover, so old skin cells are replaced with fresh ones.

5) POTATOES pack healthy carbs

POTATOES pack healthy carbs

Potatoes contain a fat-fighting compound called resistant starch that can help keep weight in check. One medium spud with the skin will run you just around 100 calories, and with more potassium than bananas, potatoes also help fight heart disease by keeping blood pressure low.

6) SPINACH is dense with key nutrients

SPINACH is dense with key nutrients

This leafy green is high in vitamin K and also contains calcium and magnesium – a combo that may help slow the breakdown of bone that occurs as you get older – as well as folate, a B vitamin that helps prevent birth defects. And it packs just 7 calories per cup raw!

7) DARK CHOCOLATE stops stress and fights disease

DARK CHOCOLATE stops stress and fights disease

European researchers found that people who ate an ounce and a half of dark chocolate – about 200 calories worth—every day for two weeks produced less of the stress hormone cortisol and reported feeling less frazzled. Cortisol causes a temporary rise in blood pressure; consistently high levels up your risk for depression, obesity, heart disease and more.

8) MUSHROOMS deliver cancer-fighting antioxidants

MUSHROOMS deliver cancer-fighting antioxidants

One study showed that women who ate just one third of an ounce of raw mushrooms a day (that’s about one button mushroom) had a 64 percent reduction in breast cancer risk. Other research suggests that mushrooms reduce the effects of aromatase, a protein that helps produce estrogen – a major factor in some breast cancers.

9) SARDINES fight heart disease

SARDINES fight heart disease

These pungent little fish are good sources of omega-3 acids, which decrease inflammation that can lead to blocked arteries. They also prevent blood clots that can cause heart attacks and strokes, and keep blood vessels smooth and supple. Three ounces of sardines have about 1.3 grams of omega-3s (you need about 1 gram a day).

10) AVOCADOS help flatten your belly

AVOCADOS help flatten your belly

Avocados are high in monounsaturated fat, which has been shown to help you drop weight, including from your troublesome middle. In one study, people who got the most monos (about 23 percent of their daily calories) had about 5 pounds less belly fat than those who ate a high-carb, lower-fat diet.

11) BELL PEPPERS protect your eyes

BELL PEPPERS protect your eyes

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and cataracts are leading causes of vision loss, but foods rich in lutein, zeaxanthin, and vitamin C, like bell peppers, can keep eyes sharp. A cup of sliced red, yellow and orange peppers contains nearly twice your daily vitamin C, plus 116 micrograms (mcg) of lutein, and 562 mcg of zeaxanthin.

12) WHOLE-GRAIN PASTA boosts energy

WHOLE-GRAIN PASTA boosts energy

Whole-grain pasta is loaded with B vitamins, which help your body convert food into energy. And unlike processed grain products that lack fiber, whole grains are more filling than their refined counterparts. In other words, you’ll feel satisfied with fewer calories. See sources.

 
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Posted by on September 29, 2014 in 2014, Lifestyle

 

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The World’s Weirdest Festivals [Infographic]

A visual guide to some of the weirdest festivals from around the world including baby jumping, cheese rolling and wife carrying.

 
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Posted by on September 28, 2014 in 2014, Infographic, Lifestyle

 

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Bring Food Education Back! [Infographic]

 
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Posted by on September 27, 2014 in Infographic, Lifestyle

 

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Things That Can Affect The Skin [Infographic]

Things that can affect the skin

 
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Posted by on September 26, 2014 in Infographic, Lifestyle

 

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It’s not 1960 – Here’s How the Picture Has Changed for Working Dads [Infograph]

Our work force and families look very different than ever before. Like moms, many dads don’t have access to paid leave or flexible workplaces. And it’s harder than ever for them to balance work and family. Look at the below infographic to know how working dad had changed.

Infographic: It's not 1960 - Here's How the Picture Has Changed for Working Dads

 
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Posted by on September 26, 2014 in Infographic, Lifestyle

 

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Too Late to Learn? [Infographic]

Late bloomers are people who achieved proficiency in some skill later than they are normally expected to. The key word is “expected.”

 too late to learn - late bloomers-people who succeeded infographic

School Is a Machine, Learning Is Not

Ever since the 19th century, when education was first standardized, learning in popular imagination is highly connected to age. The school system, back then and now, is modeled after a factory – people get education in batches, based on their date of manufacture. If you were manufactured seven years ago, that means it’s time to learn the multiplication table, for instance. And if you are ten and you still have not mastered the table, you are reshuffled to the un-smart batch. Perfect logic. Except the lives of many successful people proved it wrong. They mastered a skill at an older age. They are late bloomers. Let’s see who they are and how they did it.

Learning Languages Late: At 20 Still Spoke No English

When Joseph Conrad became one of the titans of English Literature at 39, few people knew that at 20 Joseph still spoke no English at all. He was fluent in Polish and French, growing up in the part of Poland that is now Ukraine. He learned English at sea. When he started writing, he himself and his agent hesitated about Joseph’s ability to communicate in English with readers who at the time were members of one of history’s most class-conscious societies. His foreignness proved to be an advantaged, and his English writing style became iconic.

The Reasons Why People Bloom Later

Parents

The life circumstances of late bloomers suggest that they could bloom earlier had circumstances been a bit different. Paul Cezanne’s father protested his son’s plan to study art, envisioning his son a banker like himself, possibly delaying Paul’s education as an artist. Of course, if you really set your mind to something, even parents can’t stop you.

Geography

Joseph Conrad was simply born in a non-English speaking country. Ultimately, though, it may have been to his advantage, because he may have never developed his original exotic style was he raised in England.

Finances

Sylvester Stallone originally wanted to be an actor, but being evicted from his apartment lead him to performing in soft pornographic movie roles at $200 for two days work, delaying his big break with Rocky.

Non-Dream Jobs

For some people the reason is more trivial – they were simply in the wrong, but good,  job for too long. Reid Hoffman enjoyed success at PayPal. Martha Stewart succeeded as a stoke broker. Julia Child had a stable job with the government. But as their lives later showed, they were capable of much more.

Simply Having No Clue

Fauja Singh knew what running was all his life, but it wasn’t until his son was beheaded by a flying sheet of metal, that Fauja took a different look at life. First he sank into depression. Then he moved on from India to England where he first learned what a ‘marathon’ was. He thought it was 26 kilometers when he showed up for training.  It turned out marathons are 26 miles long (41 kilometers). He still ran, even at age 100. Sometimes, ignorance is bliss.

Is It Ever Too Late to Learn?

Learning something late in life might sound like a bad deal if you compare yourself to all the young talented folk. Understandable. The catch is that doing something earlier does not necessarily make you better at it than if you did it later. Could you say that Stallone is a worse actor than actors who started in their teens? Was Julia Child a worse cook just because she started cooking at 30? With Fauja Singh it’s even easier –  just finishing the marathon at all he already wins.

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