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3 Tips for Treating Your Bicep Pain at Home

The bicep muscle is one of the most important for your upper body strength. An injury to this hardworking muscle can make day-to-day tasks difficult.

There are two places where the bicep muscle connects: the shoulder and the elbow. In your shoulder, tendons connect your bicep into the shoulder joint. In your elbow, tendons keep the muscle attached to your lower arm.

We most often see bicep injuries at the connection point with your shoulder. Strains or tears can develop in the ligaments. The tendons can also slip out of the groove at the top of the humerus — the bone of the upper arm — that holds the muscle in place. We sometimes see injuries to the bicep tendons at the elbow, but these are more rare.

These conditions result in bicep tendonitis, which is a strain or tear in the tendons that can cause a great deal of pain.

Usually a result of overuse

You may envision a bicep injury resulting from a single incident, like lifting a particularly heavy dumbbell or struggling with heavy furniture. But most of the time, bicep injuries in adults are overuse injuries and they are more common as we age. They could result from repeated lifting required for your job, picking up young children or even playing your weekly round of golf.

Since these kinds of injuries usually develop slowly over time, they are hard to prevent. Be sure to listen to your body when an activity is causing pain that goes beyond temporary muscle soreness.

Advice to speed recovery

Bicep injuries can cause you pain, but they don’t require an immediate visit to your doctor.

As with strains in other joints, you can use anti-inflammatory medications such as ibuprofen or naproxen to reduce swelling. Also, apply these three at-home treatments:

  • Rest: Take a break from the activity that’s causing pain or soreness.
  • Ice: Apply ice packs to the affected area to reduce pain and minimize swelling.
  • Elevation: Sit propped up instead of lying flat. Keep your injured joint above the level of your heart.

The experts advise patients to avoid compression because it can be difficult to wrap the shoulder and if you wrap the elbow incorrectly, it can result in hand swelling.

When to see a doctor

If you’re still experiencing pain after a few weeks of these at-home treatments, it’s time to call your doctor.

It’s rare that bicep tendonitis causes any long-term damage, and surgery is usually not required. Your doctor may recommend physical therapy as part of your treatment.

Often the hardest part of recovering from any joint or tendon injury is to fully rest the area. If you dive back too soon into the activity that’s causing your pain, you’ll slow your recovery and increase your chances of re-injury.

 

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Posted by on August 29, 2014 in 2014, Lifestyle

 

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Should You Use Ice or Heat for Pain? [Infographic]

What’s best for your aches & pains? It’s hard to get through life without straining a muscle, spraining a ligament, suffering a headache or wrenching your back. And the longer you’re on the planet, the more susceptible you are to arthritis. When something hurts, will ice or heat make it feel better? In this infographic, the experts explain when to use ice, when to use heat and why:

What's best for your aches and pains: ice or heat? #infographic #pain #heat #ice

You can apply ice and heat in lots of ways. Our experts generally recommend up to 20 minutes on and 20 minutes off:

  • Ice packs: Frozen peas or corn, ice cubes in a baggie or frozen gel pack. You can ice beyond 48 hours, until swelling, tenderness or inflammation are gone.
  • Ice massage: Freeze water in a Dixie cup, peel back the top, and massage the tender area until it’s numb. (Best for targeted icing after injury or for areas too awkward for ice packs, like the elbow or heel).
  • Cold masks: Place a cold mask, available at drugstores, over your eyes or lay a towel soaked in cold water over your forehead and temples.
  • Moist heat: Enjoy a bath, shower, hot tub or whirlpool using warm, not hot, water (92-100°).
  • Heat wraps: Drape a heat wrap, available at drugstores, around your neck like a scarf (great for work or travel).
  • Heating pads: To avoid burns, remove heating pads if the area becomes uncomfortably warm.

When to use caution 

  • Paraffin wax treatments supply moist heat but overheating can cause burns. (Treatments are labor-intensive and supplies are pricey, too.)
  • Extreme temperatures can damage skin.

 

 

 
 

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